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Topic: Gauge and Caliber< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
MikeH. Search for posts by this member.





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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,2:26  Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

In shot guns we have 12, 16, 20, 28 and some others much more rare. Then we have the .410.

The 12= .730
     20= .615
     28= .550  inches.

There is over boring and differences between companies but these are pretty much the standard.

The .410 is a caliber not a gauge. I have read that if it were converted to gauge it would be a 67 gauge.

I don't see how. I would think it would be about 45 gauge by looking at the difference is size between it and the 28 and looking at the difference between the 20 and the 12.

I assume it has to do with the lead balls, ie. 12 lead balls .730 in size equal a pound.

It just has never made sense to me. Can any one explain it?

I am bored, thought this needs to be answered.

Mike
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,2:34 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Mike, you need to get out more. I know cabin feaver when I see it!  :D

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RUFUS80 Search for posts by this member.





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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,3:07 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

From Reloading for Shotgunner 4th ed-
If gauge is applied to the 410, of would be a 36 gauge. The 410 refers to the caliber. The word gauge was hung onto it for simplicity sake.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,3:13 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I too have seen it named a 67 gauge. I think that would be closer because doing some math 7000 grains to a pound divided by 67 is 104.47 grains. Which this is closer than 36 equals 194.44. But anyway the 410 is a caliber not a gauge.

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"The gun is the essential link between the man and the kind of sport he pursues. It is not enough that it should be well adapted to one of the other. For the best success,  it must be fully adapted to both"  - Gough Thomas
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,4:10 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

a 12ga. .730   take the weight of a .730 ball of lead and divide it into a pound (545gm) it will = 12

take the dia. of any gage in a lead ball divide it into a pound and it will give you the gage.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,5:35 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I think I read somewhere that the "gauge" measurement system is not used for smaller than 50 gauge, by convention.  Thus, a .410" diameter bore is spec'ed in units of caliber rather than units of gauge because .410" converts to 67 gauge.

--shinbone
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mike campbell Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,6:02 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

The .410 would be 67 gauge.

The shotgun gauge was derived from the number of lead balls of a nominal diameter obtained from 1 pound (454 grams) of lead.

A .730 ball of pure lead weighs 37.9 gm; 12 per pound.

A .411 ball of pure lead weighs 6.74 gm; 67.3 per pound.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,6:10 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(mike campbell @ Feb. 24 2012,6:02)
QUOTE
The .410 would be 67.7 gauge (68).

The shotgun gauge was derived from the number of lead balls of a nominal diameter obtained from 1 pound (454 grams) of lead.

A .730 ball of pure lead weighs 37.9 gm; 12 per pound.

A .410 ball of pure lead weighs 6.7 gm; 67.7 per pound.

Well, I'll be ready for that question on Jeopardy.

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mike campbell Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,6:13 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Better hope you're not up against a better mathematician than I.  :blush:

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,6:20 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(mike campbell @ Feb. 24 2012,6:13)
QUOTE
Better hope you're not up against a better mathematician than I.  :blush:

:D
I always wondered why "gauge", now I know.  Thanks, Mike!


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2012,7:19 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

:oops:  i should have done the math and check for errors
(454g)
thanks mike c.
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MikeH. Search for posts by this member.





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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 27 2012,11:10 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Well Mike I think I did actually read that some place in the past.
It must have slipped my mind.

Trivia, I love it.

And yes cabin fever is not pretty.

Mike
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 Post Number: 13
mike campbell Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 27 2012,1:14 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I've always liked figgerin' on the back of a napkin. Thing is, I lose the napkin and some other joker steals my answers, like E=MC^2.  :down:

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Greg Hartman Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 27 2012,2:03 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Silly question:  Didn't the .410 originally come from loading shot in .45 Colt cases, instead of being developed at the outset as a shotgun cartridge?  If so, then the caliber, as opposed to gauge, reference makes some sense.  But, if that's so, why isn't it called the .450 instead of the .410?

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mike campbell Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 27 2012,3:30 Skip to the previous post in this topic.    QUOTE

I think the American legend is that it came from the .44XL shot cartridge, but that's not much closer than .45.

I think the consensus among collectors is that it originated in Europe decades before it was first loaded in America and may have come from the .41 Rigby.

Likewise, the 12mm and/or 36 gauge monikers also originated in Europe. The 12 mm refers to the head diameter, but I can't come up with 36 gauge mathematically from the lead ball paradigm. There's some speculation it was just a logical progression from 16, 20, 24, 28, 32....36ga. It was never in much favor.


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