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Topic: Stock Scratches, How to cover them up< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
gjw Search for posts by this member.





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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,7:20  Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Hi all, does anyone have a method to cover/hide light scratches in a varished stock without a refinish job?  Nothing deep just surface ones.

Any help would be great!

Thanks as always!!

Greg
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bigjohnsd Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,7:50 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Try some paste wax.

--------------
"To the hunt---the ancestral bond that brings all men together
regardless of nationality, regardless of custom.
Long live the hunt." - Unknown

We spend too much time "Pole Vaulting over Mouse Turds" in life and especially here!

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,8:07 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Now what did you do?

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,8:23 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(wkburns @ Feb. 04 2012,8:07)
QUOTE
Now what did you do?

Not a thing....I didn't allow you to touch it!!!  :p

Have Fun Wade!!!  :D
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bosco mctavitch Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,8:35 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Really light scratches can be completely hidden using the following patented method.  I will disclose this method here on UJ because I really value the community here.  BUT, if any of you share this method with a non-UJer a curse will be placed on your dog and all of your future dogs that will prevent them from being able to handle grouse the way a true grouse dog of that breed should....setters will bump birds, pointers will cease to point, and spaniels will start to (gasp) point.  Trust me, you DO NOT want this curse on your dog, so keep this little secret between you and me, mmmmkay??

First, look at the gun in really good morning light, by a big window....not direct sun, but with really good natural light.  If the scratches don't go through the finish you may proceed, knowing that this method will hide most of them and will not result in ANY hideous refinishing issues or detract from the value of a fine original-condition firearm AT ALL.

Next, set the gun aside.  Go to work.  Come home and DO NOT SHOWER.  Look at the gun again.  Make sure the scratches still don't go through the finish.  Mount the gun a few times and swing at an imaginary bird.  Set the gun aside.  Pour yourself a drink.  Pour yourself another drink.  Look at the gun, maybe mount it another time or two.  When you begin to get tired, go to bed, but DO NOT SHOWER.

In the morning, wake up.  Proceed directly to coffee.  Take the dog out, let him do his business.  DO NOT SHOWER YET.  Make your self some eggs with ham.  Some people call this Canadian Bacon, but really it's just ham...I don't know what's so Canadian about it.  Have another cup of coffee.  After you've had enough coffee to result in a good, SATISFYING trip to the john, pull out the stock and look at it again.  Take the index finger on your right hand (assuming you are right handed--if left handed use the opposite sides) and wipe it good and thoroughly along the hollow on the right side of your nose.  Immediately take that finger and vigorously rub the oil directly onto the scratch.  Repeat as necessary for any other scratches.  You may find you like the sheen so much that you do the whole stock in this manner.  

You are done.  

Skeptical?  Try it.


--------------

Please consider our early successional habitats before not printing this email.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,9:25 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(bosco mctavitch @ Feb. 04 2012,8:35)
QUOTE
Really light scratches can be completely hidden using the following patented method.  I will disclose this method here on UJ because I really value the community here.  BUT, if any of you share this method with a non-UJer a curse will be placed on your dog and all of your future dogs that will prevent them from being able to handle grouse the way a true grouse dog of that breed should....setters will bump birds, pointers will cease to point, and spaniels will start to (gasp) point.  Trust me, you DO NOT want this curse on your dog, so keep this little secret between you and me, mmmmkay??

First, look at the gun in really good morning light, by a big window....not direct sun, but with really good natural light.  If the scratches don't go through the finish you may proceed, knowing that this method will hide most of them and will not result in ANY hideous refinishing issues or detract from the value of a fine original-condition firearm AT ALL.

Next, set the gun aside.  Go to work.  Come home and DO NOT SHOWER.  Look at the gun again.  Make sure the scratches still don't go through the finish.  Mount the gun a few times and swing at an imaginary bird.  Set the gun aside.  Pour yourself a drink.  Pour yourself another drink.  Look at the gun, maybe mount it another time or two.  When you begin to get tired, go to bed, but DO NOT SHOWER.

In the morning, wake up.  Proceed directly to coffee.  Take the dog out, let him do his business.  DO NOT SHOWER YET.  Make your self some eggs with ham.  Some people call this Canadian Bacon, but really it's just ham...I don't know what's so Canadian about it.  Have another cup of coffee.  After you've had enough coffee to result in a good, SATISFYING trip to the john, pull out the stock and look at it again.  Take the index finger on your right hand (assuming you are right handed--if left handed use the opposite sides) and wipe it good and thoroughly along the hollow on the right side of your nose.  Immediately take that finger and vigorously rub the oil directly onto the scratch.  Repeat as necessary for any other scratches.  You may find you like the sheen so much that you do the whole stock in this manner.  

You are done.  

Skeptical?  Try it.

Will grundle oil work?

--------------
You look like a chukar hunter, you have big thighs and a small head.
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 Post Number: 7
RUFUS80 Search for posts by this member.





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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2012,11:06 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(gjw @ Feb. 04 2012,7:20)
QUOTE
Hi all, does anyone have a method to cover/hide light scratches in a varished stock without a refinish job?  Nothing deep just surface ones.

Any help would be great!

Thanks as always!!

Greg

If not deep just leave them there to remind you of the memories made with the gun hunting. Unless someone else did it, then have them pay for a complete refinish.

--------------
"The gun is the essential link between the man and the kind of sport he pursues. It is not enough that it should be well adapted to one of the other. For the best success,  it must be fully adapted to both"  - Gough Thomas
RIP Dad-KDW- 11/14/47-11/11/12
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 05 2012,9:06 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(bosco mctavitch @ Feb. 04 2012,8:35)
QUOTE
Really light scratches can be completely hidden using the following patented method.  I will disclose this method here on UJ because I really value the community here.  BUT, if any of you share this method with a non-UJer a curse will be placed on your dog and all of your future dogs that will prevent them from being able to handle grouse the way a true grouse dog of that breed should....setters will bump birds, pointers will cease to point, and spaniels will start to (gasp) point.  Trust me, you DO NOT want this curse on your dog, so keep this little secret between you and me, mmmmkay??

First, look at the gun in really good morning light, by a big window....not direct sun, but with really good natural light.  If the scratches don't go through the finish you may proceed, knowing that this method will hide most of them and will not result in ANY hideous refinishing issues or detract from the value of a fine original-condition firearm AT ALL.

Next, set the gun aside.  Go to work.  Come home and DO NOT SHOWER.  Look at the gun again.  Make sure the scratches still don't go through the finish.  Mount the gun a few times and swing at an imaginary bird.  Set the gun aside.  Pour yourself a drink.  Pour yourself another drink.  Look at the gun, maybe mount it another time or two.  When you begin to get tired, go to bed, but DO NOT SHOWER.

In the morning, wake up.  Proceed directly to coffee.  Take the dog out, let him do his business.  DO NOT SHOWER YET.  Make your self some eggs with ham.  Some people call this Canadian Bacon, but really it's just ham...I don't know what's so Canadian about it.  Have another cup of coffee.  After you've had enough coffee to result in a good, SATISFYING trip to the john, pull out the stock and look at it again.  Take the index finger on your right hand (assuming you are right handed--if left handed use the opposite sides) and wipe it good and thoroughly along the hollow on the right side of your nose.  Immediately take that finger and vigorously rub the oil directly onto the scratch.  Repeat as necessary for any other scratches.  You may find you like the sheen so much that you do the whole stock in this manner.  

You are done.  

Skeptical?  Try it.

You should see what he can do with boogers.

Edit: sorry for the low brow, coffee hadn't kicked in.


--------------
"Remember........the rest of the world thinks we are a normal family."
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Hillhaven09 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 05 2012,9:43 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(bosco mctavitch @ Feb. 04 2012,8:35)
QUOTE
Really light scratches can be completely hidden using the following patented method.  I will disclose this method here on UJ because I really value the community here.  BUT, if any of you share this method with a non-UJer a curse will be placed on your dog and all of your future dogs that will prevent them from being able to handle grouse the way a true grouse dog of that breed should....setters will bump birds, pointers will cease to point, and spaniels will start to (gasp) point.  Trust me, you DO NOT want this curse on your dog, so keep this little secret between you and me, mmmmkay??

First, look at the gun in really good morning light, by a big window....not direct sun, but with really good natural light.  If the scratches don't go through the finish you may proceed, knowing that this method will hide most of them and will not result in ANY hideous refinishing issues or detract from the value of a fine original-condition firearm AT ALL.

Next, set the gun aside.  Go to work.  Come home and DO NOT SHOWER.  Look at the gun again.  Make sure the scratches still don't go through the finish.  Mount the gun a few times and swing at an imaginary bird.  Set the gun aside.  Pour yourself a drink.  Pour yourself another drink.  Look at the gun, maybe mount it another time or two.  When you begin to get tired, go to bed, but DO NOT SHOWER.

In the morning, wake up.  Proceed directly to coffee.  Take the dog out, let him do his business.  DO NOT SHOWER YET.  Make your self some eggs with ham.  Some people call this Canadian Bacon, but really it's just ham...I don't know what's so Canadian about it.  Have another cup of coffee.  After you've had enough coffee to result in a good, SATISFYING trip to the john, pull out the stock and look at it again.  Take the index finger on your right hand (assuming you are right handed--if left handed use the opposite sides) and wipe it good and thoroughly along the hollow on the right side of your nose.  Immediately take that finger and vigorously rub the oil directly onto the scratch.  Repeat as necessary for any other scratches.  You may find you like the sheen so much that you do the whole stock in this manner.  

You are done.  

Skeptical?  Try it.

So should he wash his hands after the mighty trip to the john? Just wondering. especially if he then has to put them to his nose. :D

--------------
POINTERS SUCK AND TIM RUINS EVERYTHING!
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 Post Number: 10
browndog Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 05 2012,10:34 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

My "secret" is: Old English Scratch Guard

Start light (q-tip works) and repeat until the color matches ..wait a day as color may absorb and lighten.  When color is stable and depending on the original finish, complete with butcher block wax or stock sheen or whatever.


--------------
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Paul and Hoby
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 06 2012,9:56 Skip to the previous post in this topic.    QUOTE

Unless it is an epoxy finish, Birchwood Casey Stock Sheen Conditioner works very well or in the alternative, some good old Turtle Wax polishing compound. Just don't go crazy with the polishing compound because it contains a mild abraisive. Start with a test area. Then buff with a clean, soft cloth.
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