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Topic: Deer Steaks, My methodology...< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Brad Eden Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2012,8:11  Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

1, Kill a young buck, a very young buck... :blush:

2, Skin, quarter and age for a few+ days in cold weather or in my case a butchers walk in cooler.

3, Cut steaks; top round, sirloin, outer loin etc., NO LESS than 1" thick.

4, Rub steak w/olive oil, salt/pepper and minced fresh garlic

5, Broil (DONT FRY) or grill. I tend to broil. Broil both sides leaving it medium rare or rare whatever you want.

6, Serve w/roughly mashed garlic potatoes and a side vegetable like asparagus, corn, whatever, ( I peel off about half the skin on potatoes, cut up and boil til not quite soft, add milk, salt/pepper, butter and garlic powder and mash lightly)

7, Bask in the comments on how delicious and tender it is and that I better not shoot some big old rangy buck ever again but only does or small bucks.

Pressure off and marriage intact! :;):


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dogrunner Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2012,8:47 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Does and young bucks always taste better than older bucks, sounds like you had a great meal.
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charlo slim Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2012,9:16 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Ah.... subject after my own heart here.  We typically focus on younger animals (whitetails and mulies), and ideally in mixed ag-range country rather than strictly forest/sagebrush areas.  Seems we can tell the difference in flavor, milder in the ag-range - stronger in the forest/sage.  Of course that also tends to put our trips into areas where mixed species upland bird hunting is best anyway.  Yearling bucks are cake to id of course.  Wife is pretty good at picking yearling does as well - me not so much.

Gotta agree pretty much with the prep/cooking side of things.  Only one slight variation you might consider, and only if you do your own butchering.  We usually bone our animals completely, seperate the major muscle groups, then broil the individual prime muscle groups as one piece (usually about 1.5 to 2 inches thick in a yearling.  So the "steaks" are actually cut at serving time, fairly thin and cut diagonally across the grain. That approach means no bones are frozen and makes it easy to prevent excessive drying during cooking.  Also, when cooking for a group, the slimmer ends of the muscle bundle will be just a bit toward the med side of doneness for those who so prefer (foolish of course, but oh well).


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Ben Hong Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2012,9:27 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Oh jeeze, Bradford, many of the denizens of Olde Sherwood Forest have died for such a feast. Yummm.

For an older (and gamier) animal, marinate the meat in equal amts. of red wine and soy sauce, a couple generous pinches of thyme or oregano, garlic, and a cup of chopped fresh papaya, for  a couple of hours. If you can't get papaya, go to he spice shelves and buy a small bottle of meat tenderizer that contains "papein", the powdered active essence of papaya. Massage a couple of shakes of the powder into each steak,and let it sit a bit, then marinate.

Broiling or grilling are good methods but a quick fry job in a screaming hot cast iron pan is almost as good.


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Fur and Feathers Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 24 2012,8:54 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

We butcher our venison into separate muscle groups off the bone so you get smaller sized steaks. And well trimmed.
I like to flash fry 3/8" thick steak slices in a cast iron pan of melted butter. Season with onion powder and garlic powder, salt and pepper. Cooked to med rare. Put the cooked steaks in a bowl. Pour some water and cover the bottom of the still hot pan. Let it come to a boil while scraping the pan drippings with a fork. Pour it over the bowl of meat. Just like an au jus.
Nothing like well prepared venison no matter how its done. IMO a lot people who say they dont like venison have never had it properly prepared.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 24 2012,3:43 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Small buck chip steak tonight and mule deer flanks last night. Need to get some taters.

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steve bernadowicz Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 31 2012,12:22 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I would only add, that when marinating a steak from a more mature critter, add citrus juice of some kind. The acid helps break down connective tissue. Them little cans of pineapple juice work great.    steve b

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GWPtyler Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 31 2012,12:40 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I've quit cutting steaks when I butcher my deer, and I'll tell you why: moisture and tenderness.
I slice off the backstraps and cut them into 3/4 to 1-pound hunks. These are then cooked up WHOLE, either grilled medium rare or browned in a skillet. Then, the hunk of meat is put on a plate with a tent of foil over it for a time. At this point, I'll either make a sauce from the pan goodies, or if it's on a grill, baste it.
Immediately before serving, slice into medallions. This ensures utmost moisture retention, while limiting overcooking. If you must, place medallions into sauce for a bit to warm.
I'll never slice steaks again...
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Laminarman Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2012,8:09 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Take a piece of backstrap and slice into rounds about 1/2" thick and pound pretty flat.  Soak in buttermilk overnight.  In the morning take them out, repound lightly, dredge in seasoned flour and flash fry in butter and serve with your eggs, toast and black coffee.  Tender and tasty as heck.  If that doesn't get you going, nothing will.
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Mike Krol Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2012,9:57 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(GWPtyler @ Jan. 31 2012,12:40)
QUOTE
I've quit cutting steaks when I butcher my deer, and I'll tell you why: moisture and tenderness.
I slice off the backstraps and cut them into 3/4 to 1-pound hunks. These are then cooked up WHOLE, either grilled medium rare or browned in a skillet. Then, the hunk of meat is put on a plate with a tent of foil over it for a time. At this point, I'll either make a sauce from the pan goodies, or if it's on a grill, baste it.
Immediately before serving, slice into medallions. This ensures utmost moisture retention, while limiting overcooking. If you must, place medallions into sauce for a bit to warm.
I'll never slice steaks again...

I'm confused by this; while I fully agree in taking the backstraps whole, the steaks we cut are from the hindquarters... do you do something different?  And if you don't take steaks from the hindquarters, what do you do with them??

And if I am totally misreading your post, my apologies... it's happened a time or two in the past  :p !


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 Post Number: 11
GWPtyler Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 08 2012,9:52 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I dunno...I never make steaks out of the hindquarters. Too tough IMO. Most of it gets turned into roasts for corned venison or pastrami, or made into stew meat.
What I consider "steak" is the backstrap. But I'm a self-taught bucherer, so I'm probably waaaay off...
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charlo slim Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 08 2012,2:37 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(Mike Krol @ Feb. 07 2012,9:57)
QUOTE
.......I'll never slice steaks again...

I'm confused by this; while I fully agree in taking the backstraps whole, the steaks we cut are from the hindquarters... do you do something different?  And if you don't take steaks from the hindquarters, what do you do with them??

And if I am totally misreading your post, my apologies... it's happened a time or two in the past  :p ![/quote]



Mike --

We do use most of the muscle groups of the hind leg above the shank as "steaks", though the segments are frozen as elongated chunks of meat, cut to desired meal portion length cross-grain, with the actual steaks being cut post-cooking as mentioned above.  

There are something like 10 muscle groups ("bundles") in the hind leg above the knee.  If you cut steaks across the whole upper leg, you wind up with grain running every which-way on a given "steak".  Some of the muscle bundles are fairly tender - some not so much.  

If you look at an upper hind leg, placed inner side down, you can see some of the major muscle groups showing... with apparent "seams" running between them.  Seperating them is really pretty easy.  Just make a very, very shallow cut along the seam -- you are not really cutting the meat at this point, just cutting through the surface connective tissue that tends to hold the muscle groups together. Then work a finger into the space between groups, you will not really be cutting the meat except at anchor point to bones.  After one muscle group is removed, you can see where other groups are attached.  You just trace them out and seperate them where they attach to bone. Then remove any remaining connective tissue from muscle surface and trim muscle ends to make a regular-shaped package (trimmed ends go into burger or stewmeat).

Sounds complicated, but do it a few times and it turns out to be pretty quick and easy.  And the results are well worth it IMO. In addition to providing steaks with uniform grain and tenderness, no bones are frozen, and the method has one freezing larger pieces of meat (better freezer storage long term).

Sounds as if Fur & Feathers may be doing much the same, so maybe he can clarify anything I've managed to fog. Also, if anyone is interested, I could take a series of pics and post up next time we butcher.


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Laminarman Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 08 2012,6:37 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I see where mike and joe are coming from.  I've done it both ways.  If I do it with the whole muscle group I'll often marinade it for at least overnight, but RARE cooking is the key.  I am finishing up a younger buck I shot last year that dropped in it's tracks and didn't run.  I was lucky, had good weather afterwards and let him hang for about ten days in the hide, then skinned and butchered.  It is by far the best tasting venison I've had, tender to boot.  Last time I broiled venison steaks my wife *itched at me because I splattered the heck out of the oven.  I'm doing it again however, telling her Brad told me it was OK.
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Laminarman Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2012,8:09 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Brad, excellent simple recipe.  I made these from a top round cut.  Somebody said they're too tough, sure they're not backstrap or tenderloin, but they're not bad.  This also was not the best deer I've had, it was a doe that didn't age well due to weather and she was older and ran a bit after being hit.  I could have marinated it for a day or two, or preferably vacuum packed it to draw marinade in.  Sadly my nine year old son ate more than I did, so I got two little steaks, he got two bigger ones.  DO NOT OVERCOOK.  

Cracked black pepper, minced garlic, good virgin olive oil and grey sea salt with new potatoes.  The crispy garlic added a nice taste (some may not like it) as did the crunchy sweet sea salt.  Not pictured was a crispy salad and 1994 Cos d'Estournal Bordeaux decanted an hour before.  Heaven.  







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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 12 2012,12:39 Skip to the previous post in this topic.    QUOTE


(Laminarman @ Feb. 11 2012,7:09)
QUOTE

that's perfect.

seared over hot charcoal- i refuse to cook my venison steaks any other way. am i limiting myself or is there a better way?
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