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Topic: Deer Backstrap, Crock Pot?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 16
Cold Iron Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2011,11:28  Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(bigjohnsd @ Dec. 07 2011,5:58)
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(Ben Hong @ Dec. 07 2011,3:39)
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(looch @ Dec. 07 2011,4:51)
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I'd just cut some steaks and throw them and some butter in a screaming hot, cast iron pan. 20 seconds per side should do it.

X2

Why would you slow cook the most tender piece of meat on the animal? That's filet mignon you would be stewing!!!!

Frame Gizmo's and Slim's posts. :O  :O  :O

X 1,000,000,000,000,000

X 10 to the scientific notation of 1,000,000,000,000,000

Normal I cook venison backstrap butterflied in bacon grease. This year in SD phez hunting with BigJohnSD I had the privilege of cooking an antelope backstrap that he shot for a meal that was a special occasion. He is smart enough to only shoot a bovine with little adrenaline and that does help with tenderizing. Talk about pressure....

Marinated the straps in Red Wine, diced onions, black pepper and crushed garlic for 24 hours. Pulled them out of the marinade and let sit until glaze starts to form and covered them in a light salt crust. Grilled on high as much as I could hit high on a gas grill for 10 minutes rolling them every couple of minutes until crusted brown on the outside. Turned grill down to medium and continued to cook for additional 10 minutes. Remove and let rest for 10 minutes. They were the best straps I have ever had. Even a blind squirrel gets a lucky nut once in a while. I will do all my straps like that from now on. John made many of the suggestions and is a hell of a cook!

PS: A little wine served before hand and during always enhances any meal....
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 Post Number: 17
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2011,9:18 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 large garlic clove
1 1/2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 (1-lb) venison tenderloin
1/4 cup dry red wine
1/4 cup dried tart cherries
3/4 cup fat-free beef broth
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons black-currant jelly


Grind 1 teaspoon rosemary with coriander seeds and garlic with a mortar and pestle to make a paste, then stir in 1/2 teaspoon oil.
Pat venison dry and put in a bowl, then rub with paste. Season well with pepper, then cover and chill 20 minutes.
Preheat oven to 450°F.
Heat a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet over high heat until hot, then add remaining teaspoon oil, tilting skillet to coat evenly. Season venison well with salt, then brown, turning once, about 6 minutes total.
Transfer skillet to middle of oven and roast venison until an instant-read thermometer inserted diagonally into center registers 125°F, 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer meat to a plate and cover tightly with foil.
Add wine and cherries to skillet and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits. Stir together broth, water, cornstarch, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon rosemary in a bowl and add to skillet. Simmer, stirring, until mixture is thickened, about 5 minutes. Whisk in jelly and salt and pepper to taste.
Cut venison into 1/4-inch-thick slices and serve with sauce.

This is from the 2 Fat Ladies, and it is simply amazing.
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 Post Number: 18
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2011,10:17 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

You can do like my MiL likes to do when my SiL brings home a nice grass fed tenderloin from her boss.  She makes sure to render it inedible by boiling it, after roasting it and it comes out of the oven medium rare.

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 Post Number: 19
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2011,4:42 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Sat night after I got back from W KS I pan sauteed some of the tenderloin off the 5x5 muley I shot.  Man it was good.  Seasoned with Chipotle and sauteed in a combo of olive oil and canola.  Very tender as it had been aged a week already.



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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 15 2011,2:19 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(12ette @ Dec. 14 2011,10:18)
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This is from the 2 Fat Ladies, and it is simply amazing.

Hah!! I thought that I had seen this recipe before (my taste buds have long memories). About 20 years ago, when I was still hunting deer, I had used this recipe from the Fat Ladies' Cookbook, I think. I do miss their TV show. Their techniques harken back to the traditional and proven ways.

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I don't hunt until after noon.

If a man says something in the forest and no woman hears him, is he still wrong?
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 16 2011,8:12 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I had taken off the inner tenderloin of my bow shot HUGE TROPHY BU.....Button Buck... before taking him to my butcher. To say, after a quick sear in a cast iron pan w/ a touch of Salt/Pepper and just a dash of garlic...served w/roughly mashed taters from the garden, was delicious, well, is an understatement.

Heading over to processor pick up the rest of my steaks, a couple roasts and burger later today. Steaks all cut no less than an inch thick. Those will be rubbed w/olive oil and diced fresh garlic and broiled only. A shoulder roast will be part of our Christmas dinner.


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Sometimes you gotta say the heck with it, grab a springer and just go hunting. Unknown UJ Member


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 Post Number: 22
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 16 2011,8:56 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I loathe most of the seemingly popular reality TV shows, but I am somewhat ashamed to say that I enjoyed Ramsay's Masterchef. One of his challenges was to recreate his dish, among other things consisting of a loin from a stag. No one got it right. When he revealed his method, I recoiled, but I decided to give it a try and was impressed with the results: poach the loin in a flavoured liquid - water, wine, bay leaf, pepper corns, etc. - for about 15 - 20 minutes, until the internal temp is 5 degrees lower than the target. Finish by searing in a cast iron pan. The result is a consistent "doneness" throughout the whole piece - not dry near the edges and raw in the middle.

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 Post Number: 23
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 16 2011,10:43 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(looch @ Dec. 16 2011,8:56)
QUOTE
I loathe most of the seemingly popular reality TV shows, but I am somewhat ashamed to say that I enjoyed Ramsay's Masterchef. One of his challenges was to recreate his dish, among other things consisting of a loin from a stag. No one got it right. When he revealed his method, I recoiled, but I decided to give it a try and was impressed with the results: poach the loin in a flavoured liquid - water, wine, bay leaf, pepper corns, etc. - for about 15 - 20 minutes, until the internal temp is 5 degrees lower than the target. Finish by searing in a cast iron pan. The result is a consistent "doneness" throughout the whole piece - not dry near the edges and raw in the middle.

I saw that too, wasn't it butter poached?  One thing Ramsey has over many cooking shows is Stars.  Collectively he has over a dozen Michelin Stars, that is impressive.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 16 2011,6:55 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

I can't stand that blowhard SOB Ramsay. I used to watch him a lot, and caught him "winging it" a few times. The worst case got everyone in NB up in arms, when he tee'd off on a cook for using NB lobsters instead of Maine lobsters. He implied that the NB crustations were inferior crayfish, not lobster.

The f*cker knew nothing of geography or marine biology.


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I don't hunt until after noon.

If a man says something in the forest and no woman hears him, is he still wrong?
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 17 2011,8:47 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE


(Ben Hong @ Dec. 16 2011,6:55)
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I can't stand that blowhard SOB Ramsay. I used to watch him a lot, and caught him "winging it" a few times. The worst case got everyone in NB up in arms, when he tee'd off on a cook for using NB lobsters instead of Maine lobsters. He implied that the NB crustations were inferior crayfish, not lobster.

The f*cker knew nothing of geography or marine biology.

Going a little off-topic here, but yeah - I could do without him. Worse than him, though (on that show) was Lidia's douche of a son Joe.

David Rocco is one I won't watch for similar reasons you have for not watching Ramsay. (what a terrible sentence).


**EDIT: Rocco Dispirito is who I was thinking of - with apologies to David.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 17 2011,8:22 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

We always called the the interior loin "Squaw meat"or fish.I have been told the Originals let the women have the best part and may have ate it raw for quick protien. It can be removed with your fingers.Very special stuff where I come from.

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 Post Number: 27
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 17 2011,8:55 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic.   QUOTE

Ramsey is a favorite of my wife's cooking shows.  I used to live in Europe and had a few Brits as flat mates.  The UK accent doesn't impress me enough to watch his shows for sophmore cooking.

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 Post Number: 28
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 18 2011,10:44 Skip to the previous post in this topic.    QUOTE

If you like spicy food, give this kabob recipe I posted a while back a try.  It's my favorite way to have backstrap.

Kabob Recipe


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“Most of all, he loved the fall.” --Ernest Hemingway
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